Redactle is insanely difficult. You have to guess the title of the heavily-redacted Wikipedia page, which reveals its contents to you as you find the redacted words. I solved my first one today in a pitiful 160 guesses; my wife is very smug that she did it in 59.

📷 Not long now until the beech trees that line our back gardens burst out with their fresh leaves. The vivid green colour of new leaves is startling. They will also drastically reduce the amount of bird mess landing on our decking below.

Weeknotes #164 — Evaporated

Bristol

Bristol

Although we were no longer on a ‘proper’ holiday, I had another week away from work. This one seems to have quickly evaporated without me making much headway into my personal to-do list.

A week in which I:

  • Took my youngest boy for an eye test and booked myself in for one, the first since before the pandemic.
  • Had two visits from our plumbing insurance company to try and resolve the issue with our immersion heater electrics. The first guy turned up to tell me that he didn’t fix ‘unvented’ things (like immersion heaters), only ‘vented’ things (like boilers). This resulted in a second guy turning up, who took a look for two seconds and then told me the electricity supply to the immersion isn’t covered under our insurance. What a waste of time.
  • Took a trip to Ross-on-Wye to see my wife’s parents for the day. We stayed overnight and travelled to Bristol the next day to visit my brother-in-law, his wife and our newest nephew. Children really grow up quickly when you don’t see them day-to-day. He’s six months old already and so different to when we saw him last time, with his lovely smile being beamed to everyone. As we went to find a spot to eat our lunch, we couldn’t believe our eyes when we saw a giant seagull take someone’s wrap from their hands as they ate.
Stuff in the muddy riverbanks in Bristol

Stuff in the muddy riverbanks in Bristol

  • Travelled into London to see Macbeth at Shakespeare’s Globe theatre. Trains into and out of Euston were cancelled all weekend due to engineering works, so we planned to go into town via the tube from Chesham. But when we got there, the line had stopped running due to an incident. Our only choice was to bite the bullet and drive in, paying the congestion charge and parking as close to the theatre as we could. The venue is lovely to look at but let down by modern impracticalities — the un-amplified voices of the actors were regularly drowned out by the sounds of passing aircraft and helicopters, and as it was so hot we saw four people in the audience collapsing and being taken out in wheelchairs. It was fun to go once, but I won’t do it again.
London was busier than I have seen it in years

London was busier than I have seen it in years

  • Paid a visit to Deco Audio in Aylesbury to pick up my repaired CD player and browse the second-hand vinyl. I was very restrained, picking up only a couple of records. I’ve wanted to get the player up and running again as quite a few boxed sets I’ve bought recently have included CDs. Playing them over the air in the house isn’t quite the same as settling down to listen to something physical.
  • Had a sunny Sunday lovely afternoon at a friends’ house, with drinks and nibbles in the back garden.
  • Spent a lot of the week exercising. I feel like I’ve been overdoing it a little bit and could do with a lie-in, and Strava seems to agree. But I’m also conscious that I will be back at work next week and won’t be able to exercise on the days that I go into the office. Ideally I’d like to keep up the running habit that I got into in Málaga alongside my bike riding. It has been brilliant to get back out riding outside on multiple days.
This week’s efforts

This week’s efforts

Riders passing us on Saturday as our group stopped to solve a puncture

Riders passing us on Saturday as our group stopped to solve a puncture

A beautiful place to stop

A beautiful place to stop

Next week: Seeing my brothers and their families for the first time in a long time, a couple of album club evenings, and getting back to work.

Weeknotes #163 — Málaga

The port of Málaga

The port of Málaga

For the first time in over two years we hopped on a plane and went off on holiday. I’ve been feeling for some time as though I needed a change of scenery and a proper break; I have weeks of unused holiday days to spend before the end of June which itself tells me how little I’ve been away from work. Finding somewhere that was guaranteed to be warm in April, wasn’t too far away from the UK and wouldn’t cost the Earth was a tall order. We found ourselves crossing our fingers and heading to Málaga, a city on Spain’s south coast that was previously only familiar to me through the pages of my ¡Vaya! Libro 1 textbook at school. We had a rough sketch of a plan for the week but I was keen to not book in too many activities, fearing that a plan would detract from taking things easy. We had a wonderful time.

Although we live close to London, we thought that we would experiment with flying out of Birmingham Airport as it is only 90 minutes north of here. The experience was excellent — the airport is smaller and much less busy than those that we normally use and we were through the check-in and security processes in no time. We were travelling with Jet2.com; I’d never heard of them before, but apparently they are the UK’s third-largest scheduled airline with 94 aircraft in their fleet. For a short-haul flight they were fine. The staff were super friendly and helpful, and the aircraft itself was sparse but functional. We didn’t need anything else.

Flying through the clouds

Flying through the clouds

Our base for the week was the Barceló hotel, located above the central train station. We managed to get two interconnecting rooms, which allowed us to go to sleep while our two (almost) teenage boys could stay up and turn their light off when they were ready to do the same. The room was fine, although it had a strange view over the gigantic rooftop of the station. Most of the old town with its sights and restaurants was located a short walk away, which we ended up being grateful for after our evening meal. The hotel didn’t seem to quite know who it was pitched at. We didn’t see many other families there and there were a few businesspeople at breakfast, but it also had a slide going down from the dining area into the lobby which the kids loved.

Barceló Málaga

Barceló Málaga

Hotel slide

Hotel slide

Almost every time we went out we had to cross the dry river bed of the Guadalmedina. It divides the city in two and the concrete channel looks quite an eyesore; from what I could tell it is used a place for people to take their dogs to use the toilet. But it serves a bigger purpose. Back in 1907 Málaga suffered devastating floods; presumably this construction would prevent something similar happening in the future.

Dry Guadalmedina

Dry Guadalmedina

For a working port city, Málaga is beautiful. We acquainted ourselves through an evening walk on the day that we arrived as well as a run the next morning. The port area has been made attractive by all kinds of lovely architecture, from the Centre Pompidou to the wonderful zig-zagging pergola (‘The Palm Grove of Surprises’).

The Palm Grove of Surprises, covered in red dust

The Palm Grove of Surprises, covered in red dust

In the old town

In the old town

The food market

The food market

Lighthouse

Lighthouse

All of the buildings, windows and pavements were covered in a fine red dust, the consequence of gigantic Saharan dust storms that had engulfed the region a few weeks before. We had some rain for the first few days that we were there but it didn’t seem to do much to shift it.

The meals we had throughout the week were excellent, and great value when compared to the UK. We had a few adventures with churros and chocolate, as well as tapas, and dinner at a wonderful homely restaurant that was recommended by a friend.

Churros and coffee

Churros and coffee

Tapas at Mesón Ibérico

Tapas at Mesón Ibérico

Indonesian satay vegetables at Mamuchis

Indonesian satay vegetables at Mamuchis

Pasta at La Pala D’Oro

Pasta at La Pala D’Oro

Tapas at Casa Lola

Tapas at Casa Lola

There are a few sights to see in the old town, including Gibralfaro Castle and the Alcazaba fortress, both of which give spectacular views of the city. At their base is a Roman amphitheatre.

View from Gibralfaro

View from Gibralfaro

One of the many splendidly perilous walkways around the Castle

One of the many splendidly perilous walkways around the Castle

The Roman ampitheatre

The Roman ampitheatre

View of the bullfighting ring near the port

View of the bullfighting ring near the port

Religion seems to play a major part in the life of the city. The cathedral is breathtaking in its size and ornateness. While we were there, the city was getting ready for Holy Week, erecting portable stadium seating and laying out thousands of chairs ready for a week of parades.

Málaga Cathedral

Málaga Cathedral

Detail inside the cathedral

Detail inside the cathedral

Surprisingly, not the main entrance to the cathedral

Surprisingly, not the main entrance to the cathedral

The city is also famous as the birthplace of Pablo Picasso. In the centre of the old town is a lovely museum of his works. There is plenty to see, covering his paintings, drawings and sculptures broadly in chronological order.

Contemplating a Picasso

Contemplating a Picasso

My eldest son and I hired some road bikes from bike2malaga. Along with our wonderful guide, we had a great day puffing our way out of the city and into the mountains. My son had never been up a proper mountain pass before but he seemed to love it. We had a comedy moment where one of us fell off on a climb, causing the others to stop and check they were ok, and then struggling to get back into the pedals and get going again. The day started a little cloudy, got very hot on the way up the first pass and then was freezing on the descent. We wisely decided to avoid the village we were heading for when we could see it getting rained on from our view on the other side of the valley. By the time we got back to the city the sun was shining and I was ready for an ice cream.

Mountains, with all the weathers

If you look closely, you’ll spot my son

If you look closely, you’ll spot my son

View from the road

View from the road

“I’ve never seen it looking greener than this.”

“I’ve never seen it looking greener than this.”

“I’ve only ever done this as a descent, I’ve not climbed it!”

“I’ve only ever done this as a descent, I’ve not climbed it!”

At the top of a climb

At the top of a climb

We hired a car for a couple of days and made a journey out to Ronda. (No, not that one. Similar.) The town is divided in two by a deep chasm which has been bridged by a magnificent construction. It is stunning. We spent most of the day wandering up and down the various paths, getting different views of the town and its surroundings.

Seems as good a place as any to build a town

Seems as good a place as any to build a town

A view of one side of Ronda from the other

A view of one side of Ronda from the other

The bridge across the chasm

The bridge across the chasm

Looking out from Ronda

Looking out from Ronda

On the way back, we stopped at the town of Setenil de las Bodegas, famous for its houses that have been built into the sides of overhanging rocks. It was strange to peer into some of the empty dwellings to see literally one room, with a back wall made up of the rock face. Leaving the town was terrifying; our sat-nav took us on a route through the narrowest of side streets, underneath rocks and passing by people atop ladders that were painting their houses. I felt like Clark W Griswald in European Vacation as I edged the car forward, expecting an accident at any moment.

Houses built into the rock face

Houses built into the rock face

Wandering around the town

Wandering around the town

View from the car. Even more terrifying than it looks.

View from the car. Even more terrifying than it looks.

On the second day with the car we ventured to Marbella to take a look around. Although the sea front was pretty, it wasn’t worth the visit. Being there would be great if we were in our late teens as there were plenty of bars to hop around, but it didn’t seem as though it had anything that central Málaga couldn’t offer.

Marbella seafront

Marbella seafront

To cap our week off we booked tickets to watch Málaga CF play Real Valladolid CF at La Rosaleda Stadium. Sitting in the afternoon sun was such a treat. The atmosphere was brilliant despite the stadium not being full. There seemed to be so many more families at the game than I’ve seen at other places. Málaga went 2-0 up before the visitors pulled it back to 2-2, with the second goal happening right in front of us. We loved it.

Heading into the stadium

Heading into the stadium

Beautiful venue, beautiful game

Beautiful venue, beautiful game

We all had such a lovely week, with plenty to fill our time. I’ve returned home not quite as rested as I expected, but this was self-inflicted through early morning starts for running, cycling and watching the Australian Grand Prix, as well as tons of walking every day. Malaga was well worth a visit.

A chilly Málaga morning

A chilly Málaga morning

Next week: Another week off, this time at home. Catching up with sleep and eyeing up my personal to-do list.